Webinar

Uncover the Novel Mechanism of Muscle Development

September 22, 2022

Description

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Join us September 22 at 3:00 p.m. ET for a live, educational webinar hosted by The American Society for Cell Biology (ASCB) as we provide a timely update on the understanding of the molecular mechanism underlying human myoblast fusion.

Pengpeng Bi, Ph.D., who discovered the Myomixer, a long-sought membrane protein, will introduce an interesting fusion model of human myoblasts that includes two muscle-specific membrane proteins – the Myomaker and the Myomixer. By CRISPR mutagenesis and biochemical assays, he identified MyoD as the key molecular switch of fusion, which is required and sufficient to initiate Myomaker and Myomixer expressions.

Dr. Bi will also introduce a recent study of myoblast fusion in various groups of chordates. An evolutionary comparison between vertebrate and non-vertebrate muscle fusion proteins revealed key structural and mechanistic insights into myoblast fusion.

From this educational webinar, you will learn:

  • New genetic and molecular approaches to uncovering the novel mechanism of tissue development, which includes the application of CRISPR mutagenesis at both the whole-genome level and single-gene level, for the study of gene function and regulation
  • The crucial aspect about the design of CRISPR gene-knockout and loss-of-function screening experiments
  • How evolutionary comparison can lead to novel mechanistic insights into human tissue development

A live Q&A will follow Dr. Bi’s presentation.

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About the speaker:

Pengpeng Bi received his Ph.D. degree from Purdue University in 2015. His thesis project focused primarily on the molecular regulation of cell fate choice in muscle and adipose tissues. He then joined Dr. Eric Olson's lab at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center as a postdoctoral researcher. By collaborating with his colleagues, Dr. Bi discovered a long-sought membrane protein named Myomixer that controls myoblast fusion and muscle development. In August 2018, he started his own lab as an independent investigator in the Center for Molecular Medicine and Department of Genetics at the University of Georgia, where he has continually studied the mechanisms of myogenesis.

Recent works from his lab were published in Science Advances (2020), Genome Research (2021), PLoS Genetics (2021), and Science Advances (2022). Among several honors, Dr. Bi received the Outstanding Ph.D. Award for Chinese Students Abroad (2015); the Distinguished Reviewer Award from American Diabetes Association (2017); UGA nominee of Pew and Searle Scholar programs; Editorial Board member in the journal Diabetes.

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